Water Quality in the Richardson Mountain catchments
Principal Investigator: CLARK, Ian D. (5)
Licence Number: 12925
Organization: University of Ottawa
Licenced Year(s): 1997
Issued: Jun 20, 1997
Project Team: Bernard Lauriol, Iannick Lamirande, Eric Deschamps and Mark Marschner

Objective(s): The objectives of this research are to study the chemistry of the groundwater's that flow into the Little Fish River near the Cache Creek overwintering hole. The role of carbonate rocks is important as there is a lot of subsurface flow in this rock type. The presence of the aufeis (winter icing) on Cache Creek is a sign of groundwater flow, and is one of the reasons that this site was chosen. We will study the chemistry of the groundwater's at these two sites to compare the effect of different rock types. We will be sampling water from springs and seeps in the area, as well as river water and surface water. These samples will be analysed for chemistry at our laboratory at the University of Ottawa. We hope to be able to understand what controls the chemistry of this runoff and how it may be changing with global warming. This information is important to understanding how a warmer climate in the north will affect the land in this region. It may also help understand changes to the water, and how this may affect fish.

Project Description: The objectives of this research are to study the chemistry of the groundwaters that flow into the Little Fish River near the Cache Creek overwintering hole. The role of carbonate rocks is important as there is a lot of subsurface flow in this rock type. The presence of the aufeis (winter icing) on Cache Creek is a sign of groundwater flow, and is one of the reasons that this site was chosen. We will study the chemistry of the groundwaters at these two sites to compare the effect of different rock types. We will be sampling water from springs and seeps in the area, as well as river water and surface water. These samples will be analysed for chemistry at our laboratory at the University of Ottawa. We hope to be able to understand what controls the chemistry of this runoff and how it may be changing with global warming. This information is important to understanding how a warmer climate in the north will affect the land in this region. It may also help understand changes to the water, and how this may affect fish. We will be transported to our sites by helicopter provided by Polar Shelf. There will be no need for fuel caching.