Understanding Coastal Change along the Beaufort Sea Coast.
Principal Investigator: Solomon, Steve (3)
Licence Number: 13051
Organization: Geological Survey of Canada
Licenced Year(s): 2000 1999 1997 1996 1995 1994 1993 1992
Issued: Jul 09, 1999
Project Team: D. Frobel

Objective(s): The Beaufort Sea coast is one of the most rapidly changing coastlines in the world and is identified as one of the most vulnerable to climate change. The Geological Survey of Canada has been studying the causes for this phenomenon for the past four years under the Coastal Impacts of Climate Change Program and has developed a much better understanding of the processes which govern the changes. However, because of limited budgets and the variable nature of both the coastline and the climatic and ocean conditions which affect it, our research is incomplete and we propose to extend the program for at least an additional three years. The primary objectives of the project are to map the coastline of the Canadian Beaufort Sea in terms of its sensitivity to coastal erosion and monitor changes in the coastline, and to collect information on the morphology of the coast and the sediments which compose it for use in developing and calibrating predictive models of coastal change.

Project Description: The primary objectives of the project are to map the coastline of the Canadian Beaufort Sea in terms of its sensitivity to coastal erosion and monitor changes in the coastline, and to collect information on the morphology of the coast and the sediments which compose it for use in developing and calibrating predictive models of coastal change. A helicopter video survey of the coastline will be conducted from Clarence Lagoon to Cape Dalhousie over a period of 2-3 days. Ground-based surveys will be undertaken at the Hamlet of Tuktoyaktuk (to monitor the performance of newly installed shore protection), North Head, Tibjak Point, and if time permits at Atkinson Point, Tent Island, Taglu Island and Ellice Island. Echosounding surveys will be performed at some or all of the following sites: Tuktoyaktuk, Tibjak Point and North Head.