PolarDARN - The northern hemisphere polar portion of the international SuperDARN (Super Dual Auroral Radar Network) program

Regions: Inuvialuit Settlement Region, Gwich'in Settlement Area

Tags: physical sciences, climatology, weather, magnetic field

Principal Investigator: Sofko, George J (9)
Licence Number: 14150
Organization: ISAS, Dept. of Physics & Eng. Phys., Univ. of Saskatchewan
Licenced Year(s): 2013 2012 2011 2010 2009 2008 2007 2004
Issued: Apr 30, 2007
Project Team: Dr. A. V. Koustov (co-investigating scientist, U of SK), Dr. Kathryn McWilliams (co-investigating scientist, U of SK), Dr. Glenn Hussey (co-investigating scientist, U of SK), Dr. Dieter Andre (co-investigating scientist, U of SK), Dr. John MacDougall (co-investigating scientist, UWO), Dr. Frances Fenrich (co-investigating scientist, U of Alberta), Dr. Eric Donovan (co-investigating scientist, U of Calgary), Dr. J-P St-Maurice (co-investigating scientist, U of SK), Dr. Masakazu Watanabe (Research Associate, U of SK), Dr. Robert Rankin (co-investigating scientist, U of Alberta), Dr. Ian Mann (co-investigating scientist, U of Alberta), Dr. Andrew Yau (co-investigating scientist, U of Calgary)

Objective(s): The radar network is designed to measure voltage patterns several hundred kilometers above the ground, as these patterns project out into space along the Earth's magnetic field lines. Just as high and low pressure systems drive normal weather, high and low voltages drive space weather. This information is critical to personnel in space and to maintenance of satellite telecommunications.

Project Description: The radar network is designed to measure voltage patterns several hundred kilometers above the ground, as these patterns project out into space along the Earth's magnetic field lines. Just as high and low pressure systems drive normal weather, high and low voltages drive space weather. This information is critical to personnel in space and to maintenance of satellite telecommunications.

The radar installation is rather simple, requiring transmitting and receiving electronics in a small building, and antennas outside. The radar requires a local Field Technical Support Officer for routine checks, regular maintenance operations and for special maintenance when problems with the electronic and antenna systems arise. During the construction phase, the University of Saskatchewan SuperDARN engineer, Jan Wiid, will require a team to install the antennas – this should last no longer than a month in 2007.

The researchers are willing to provide seminars and talks in the NWT. All scientific publications resulting from the project will be made available to the Aurora Research Institute.
Fieldwork will be conducted from July 23 to December 31, 2007 at LOT 8, PLAN 50540, GROUP 1355, Inuvik (68º24’52”N, 133º46’11”W).