Structure and Carbon Dynamics of Boreal Forests

Regions: South Slave Region

Tags: biology, vegetation, forestry, carbon, black spruce, jack pine, biophysics

Principal Investigator: Osawa, Akira (26)
Licence Number: 14209
Organization: Kyoto University, Graduate School of Agriculture
Licenced Year(s): 2017 2016 2015 2014 2013 2012 2011 2010 2009 2008 2007 2006 2005 2004 2003 2002 2001
Issued: Jul 26, 2007
Project Team: Nahoko Kurachi-Osawa (Aboveground litter analysis, logistics, Hiraoka Forest Institute), Koji Fukusaki (Student, Kyoto University), Hatena Osawa (Field assistant, NA)

Objective(s): The main objective of the 2007 field work is to collect data in jack pine forests on annual movement of organic matter and carbon. For this purpose, the researchers will continue measurement of the growth of fine roots and amount of aboveground forest litter, in addition to take re-measurement of tree size and number in study plots to assess the growth of the trees since 2002. Additional objective is to establish some study plots of black spruce for a similar study of carbon dynamics in thosThe main objective of the 2007 field work is to collect data in jack pine forests on annual movement of organic matter and carbon. For this purpose, the researchers will continue measurement of the growth of fine roots and amount of aboveground forest litter, in addition to take re-measurement of tree size and number in study plots to assess the growth of the trees since 2002. Additional objective is to establish some study plots of black spruce for a similar study of carbon dynamics in those ecosystems.

Possibility of the climate warming demands detailed analysis of carbon budget in boreal forests as they may be the earth's major carbon sinks. This research has been examining the carbon dynamics of jack pine forests in Wood Buffalo National Park since 2002. The data so far suggest that these forests may be losing carbon to the atmosphere when young, gaining a lot of carbon at middle ages, and more or less stable when old. Because of the large annual variability in carbon accumulation patterns in forests, it is necessary to continue the measurements.

Five methods will be used. 1) Soil and air temperature will be measured with sensors and data loggers. 2) Aboveground forest litter will be collected with the litter traps. 3) Several trees will be cut, and weights of their organs will be measured to improve accuracy of our tree biomass equations. 4) Annual growth of fine roots will be estimated by recovering the thin soil columns placed in the study plots in 2004. New soil columns will be set for additional estimates of fine root dynamics. 5) A few study plots of black spruce will be established, marked permanently for a similar study of carbon dynamics. Tree sizes and numbers of these stands will be measured as the base-line data.

Results of the study will be published in scientific journals. The researchers may also explain the results in presentations in plain language to the local community.

Fieldwork will be conducted from July 26 to August 31, 2007 at (a) Forest stands adjacent to and along Highway #5, between the Park boundary of Wood Buffalo National Park west of Fort Smith and Angus Tower (Study area a), (b) Black spruce stands outside of Wood Buffalo National Park and along Highway #5, between the Park boundary west of Fort Smith and the intersection between the road leading to Thebacha Campground and Highway #5 (excluding the settlement near Salt River) (Study area b).

Project Description: The main objective of the 2007 field work is to collect data in jack pine forests on annual movement of organic matter and carbon. For this purpose, the researchers will continue measurement of the growth of fine roots and amount of aboveground forest litter, in addition to take re-measurement of tree size and number in study plots to assess the growth of the trees since 2002. Additional objective is to establish some study plots of black spruce for a similar study of carbon dynamics in those ecosystems.

Possibility of the climate warming demands detailed analysis of carbon budget in boreal forests as they may be the earth's major carbon sinks. This research has been examining the carbon dynamics of jack pine forests in Wood Buffalo National Park since 2002. The data so far suggest that these forests may be losing carbon to the atmosphere when young, gaining a lot of carbon at middle ages, and more or less stable when old. Because of the large annual variability in carbon accumulation patterns in forests, it is necessary to continue the measurements.

Five methods will be used. 1) Soil and air temperature will be measured with sensors and data loggers. 2) Aboveground forest litter will be collected with the litter traps. 3) Several trees will be cut, and weights of their organs will be measured to improve accuracy of our tree biomass equations. 4) Annual growth of fine roots will be estimated by recovering the thin soil columns placed in the study plots in 2004. New soil columns will be set for additional estimates of fine root dynamics. 5) A few study plots of black spruce will be established, marked permanently for a similar study of carbon dynamics. Tree sizes and numbers of these stands will be measured as the base-line data.

Results of the study will be published in scientific journals. The researchers may also explain the results in presentations in plain language to the local community.
Fieldwork will be conducted from July 26 to August 31, 2007 at (a) Forest stands adjacent to and along Highway #5, between the Park boundary of Wood Buffalo National Park west of Fort Smith and Angus Tower (Study area a), (b) Black spruce stands outside of Wood Buffalo National Park and along Highway #5, between the Park boundary west of Fort Smith and the intersection between the road leading to Thebacha Campground and Highway #5 (excluding the settlement near Salt River) (Study area b).