Sekwi Mountain Project
Principal Investigator: Martel, Edith (5)
Licence Number: 14225
Organization: Northwest Territories Geoscience Office
Licenced Year(s): 2007 2006
Issued: Aug 01, 2007
Project Team: Steve Gordey (Research scientist, GSC Pacific), Charlie Roots (Research scientist, GSC Yukon), Rob MacNaughton (Research scientist, GSC Calgary), Karen Fallas (Research scientist, GSC Calgary), jim Mortensen (University Professor, UBC), Shoufa Lin (University Professor, UofW), Elizabeth Turner (University Professor, UofL), Darrel Long (University Professor, UofL), Hamish Sandeman (Research scientist, NTGO), Luke Ootes (Research scientist, NTGO), Wil Zantvoort (Research scientist, NTGO), Chris Leslie (M.Sc. student, UBC), Justin MacDonald (M.Sc. student, UofW), Beth Fischer (M.Sc. student, NTGO), Melanie Mercier (Student, NTGO), Ryan (Versloot, NTGO)

Objective(s): The objectives of the Sekwi Mountain project are: (1) Provide an updated geological database for a segment of the Mackenzie Mountains; (2) Assess the mineral potential of the area; (3) Assess the hydrocarbon (oil and gas, coal) potential of the area; (4) Provide tectonic model for the assembly of the Mackenzie Mountains; (5) Produce an user-friendly guide to the geology of the Canol Heritage Trail for hikers, hunters, tourists and locals.

Project Description: The objectives of the Sekwi Mountain project are: (1) Provide an updated geological database for a segment of the Mackenzie Mountains; (2) Assess the mineral potential of the area; (3) Assess the hydrocarbon (oil and gas, coal) potential of the area; (4) Provide tectonic model for the assembly of the Mackenzie Mountains; (5) Produce an user-friendly guide to the geology of the Canol Heritage Trail for hikers, hunters, tourists and locals.

The Sekwi Mountain Mapping project area (NTS sheets 105P and 106A) is located in the Selwyn and Mackenzie Mountains of the Northwest Territories, approximately 500 km west of Yellowknife and 100 km southwest of Norman Wells. Available geological data for this area is sparse and limited to 1:250 000 scale mapping by the Geological Survey of Canada in the late 1970’s. The geology of the area is poorly understood and no modern geoscience data sets are available. Moreover, the Mackenzie Mountains of the Northwest Territories are considered to have significant mineral potential, and should not remain under-explored. The mapping project will define the structural, stratigraphic, metallogenic and geochronological characteristics of the bedrock. It will also assess the mineral, diamond and hydrocarbon potential of the area. This will provide an up-dated geological database that will be included in a GIS-based compilation of bedrock geology, geophysical data, satellite images, and mineral occurrences that is underway for part of the Mackenzie Mountains. The data obtained will further the scientific knowledge of the area and aid in mineral exploration such as for tungsten, lead-zinc, copper, coal, gold and diamond.

The mapping team will be flown out by fixed wings from Norman Wells and/or Wrigley. A camp will be established and will consist of 6 researchers, led by Edith Martel. With helicopter support, researchers will make daily walks, noting the details of the rocks that they are waking on. The data are inserted into palm pilots (hand help computers) during the day and, when back in camp in the evening, the data are entered into a computer database. Sometimes, 1-5kg samples of rocks are collected for further examination in a laboratory. Collection of samples is done with a hammer. No heavy equipment is required for this sampling program.
These samples will give information on the composition and age of the rock and what has happened to the rock since it was formed. A number of small 2-persons camps will be established when remote areas require 4-5 days of examinations. Food and supplies will be brought out in the field by floatplane from Norman Wells every 10 days. The camp and crew will be brought out of the field by plane at the end of the season.

Reports and maps will be published and available to the public after each field seasons. The publications will be available through the researchers’ website (free download at http://www.nwtgeoscience.ca/minerals/sekwi.html) and as hard copies from their office in Yellowknife. Presentations will be given at various geological conferences across Canada and wherever requested. Workshops with colleagues are attended once or twice a year. Once a year, the researchers will conduct community consultation in Norman Wells to discuss the project.

Fieldwork will be conducted from August 01 to September 30, 2007 at Sekwi Mountain (NTS sheet 105P), Mount Eduni (106A) and Wrigley Lake (95M), between latitude 63 00 and 65 00 and longitude 128 00 and 130 00, 105 miles from Norman Wells.