Surficial geology of Mackenzie Corridor
Principal Investigator: Duk-Rodkin, Alejandra ADR (6)
Licence Number: 14231
Organization: Geological Survey of Canada
Licenced Year(s): 2007 2006 2005 2004
Issued: Aug 10, 2007
Project Team: David Huntley (geologist, Geological Survey of Canada), Holly Arnold (field research assistant, Geological Survey of Canada), Rene Barendredgt (visiting scientist, University of Lethbridge), Paul Sandbourn (visiting scientist, University of Northern British Columbia), Second student (field research assistant, University of Calgary or Victoria), Andria Mills (visiting geologist, NTGO), Cindy Livingston (cook and bear monitor, Geological Survey of Canada), Pilot A (helicopter pilot, Great Slave Helicopters), Pilot B (helicopter pilot, Great Slave Helicopters)

Objective(s): Project objectives are to map, identify, describe characteristics (geotechnical aspects) and date surficial deposits in the vicinity of the proposed pipeline corridor. This knowledge will assess: 1. granular resources. 2. slope instability, landslide occurrence and potential due mainly to instability of the active layer, forest fires and erosion. 3. geochemical analysis on a regional basis of till and gravel samples collected during mapping.

Project Description: Project objectives are to map, identify, describe characteristics (geotechnical aspects) and date surficial deposits in the vicinity of the proposed pipeline corridor. This knowledge will assess: 1. granular resources. 2. slope instability, landslide occurrence and potential due mainly to instability of the active layer, forest fires and erosion. 3. geochemical analysis on a regional basis of till and gravel samples collected during mapping.

Mapping surficial deposits will help to delimit the distribution of surficial deposits and landforms in the Mackenzie River watershed and better define the regional limits, styles and chronology of glaciations and interglacial stages. In addition, it will help to understand the nature and extent of the glacial lake formation (e.g., glacial lakes Nahanni and Mackenzie) and post-glacial tectonic evolution of the region.

Access will be done mainly by helicopter and truck in summer roads. Only shovels will be used to collect samples of soils and pebbles. Samples will be taken for geochemical analysis in plastic bags to contain approximately 2 kilograms of sample.

Depending on local interest, the researchers can present a talk at the Trout Lake school (or community centre) on the regional geology. A poster depicting the glacial history of the area can also be donated upon request.
Fieldwork will be conducted from August 10 to September 30, 2007, on the Deh Cho region, between 60N and 62N and 119W to 121W. Base camp location will be at Dogface Lake (60.17N 119.07W).