Impacts of Oil and Gas Activity on the Peoples in the Arctic Using a Multiple Securities Perspective

Regions: Inuvialuit Settlement Region, Gwich'in Settlement Area, Sahtu Settlement Area, Dehcho Region

Tags: petroleum industry, biology, vegetation, traditional knowledge, environmental baseline

Principal Investigator: Elliott, Milissa A (1)
Licence Number: 14345
Organization: York University
Licenced Year(s): 2008
Issued: May 12, 2008
Project Team: TBD (Field Assisant , Local community memeber), Paul Marmer (Researcher, York University), Dr. Dawn Bazely (Supervisor , York University), Dr. Jorg Girgull (Co-Supervisor, York University), TBD (Field Assisant, TBD)

Objective(s): This project seeks to identify and measure specific characteristics of plants to determine the current baseline conditions of the vegetation, collect grass samples to test for different species of fungi and integrate traditional knowledge of environmental systems with current biological sampling.

Project Description: This project seeks to identify and measure specific characteristics of plants to determine the current baseline conditions of the vegetation, collect grass samples to test for different species of fungi and integrate traditional knowledge of environmental systems with current biological sampling.

Transects (a long straight line) will be measured out from the edge of a road to about 1 km away from the road. A maximum of 20 transects will completed. At least ten quadrats will be sampled every 50 meters along the transects. Within each quadrat all known species of plants will be identified and their characteristics (height, number of leaves, number of flowers, current reproductive stage) will be recorded. Grasses will have 5-10 shoots removed (approximately 10mm x 3mm).
Community members may participate in a survey of plant photos if desired. Participants must sign a consent form, be over 18 years of age, and have the choice to remain anonymous. Participants who want to be recorded will have a transcript sent to them, and notes taken can be reviewed by the participant. The questions could included: Which plants have been seen? Have new plants been seen recently? Does this plant have a use? Does it have a different name than the one provided? What animals eat the plant?

Transportation will be by ATV.
Approximately two weeks will be spent in each community beginning June 15 in Fort Simpson.
Results will be communicated through websites, maps, and plain language reports distributed to each community.
Benefits include the opportunity to identify non-native plant species that potentially have the ability to cause harm. Elders will have the chance to pass on traditional knowledge. Local youth may be employed, and local equipment and lodging rented.
Fieldwork will be conducted from June 13 to September 01, 2008 within the municipal boundaries of Inuvik, Fort Good Hope and Fort Simpson.