DEW Line Passage: Tracing the Legacies of Arctic Militarization

Regions: Inuvialuit Settlement Region, Gwich'in Settlement Area

Tags: environmental impact, socio-cultural, oral history, social impact, DEW line

Principal Investigator: Fritz, Stacey A. (1)
Licence Number: 14359
Organization: University of Alaska Fairbanks
Licenced Year(s): 2008
Issued: Jun 12, 2008
Project Team: Ryan Tinsley (Expedition leader, Arctic Small Boat Adventures)

Objective(s): The objective of this study is to investigate what people think about
the DEW Line radar stations, and write a dissertation that describes
how the DEW Line impacted the Arctic socially and environmentally.

Project Description: This licence was issued for the application no. 832.

The objective of this study is to investigate what people think about the DEW Line radar stations, and write a dissertation that describes how the DEW Line impacted the Arctic socially and environmentally.

The researchers will be traveling across the Arctic coast by canoe equipped with sail rigs. They are driving to Fort McPherson from Alaska so that they can put the canoe in on the Peel/West Channel of the Mackenzie Delta and then travel west with the prevailing winds to Alaska. They hope to leave Aklavik when the sea ice goes out, around early July. They may spend a week or two in Aklavik if the ice goes out later than usual. The researchers would like to interview people in Aklavik and along their way. They will record the interviews with a digital video camera. They would like to interview up to 10 or 15 people in Aklavik and campsites if people are interested. The research project involves interviewing northern residents whose lives and/or communities have been affected by the DEW Line. Before arriving in each community, a public presentation on the research project will be announced and advertised through several media. Personal invitations will be extended once the team arrives. The presentations should both be relevant to casual attendees and give more interested community members the chance to assess the project before considering participation as informants.

All communities will be provided with CDs and/or hard paper versions of the information gathered. Most of this information will be available on a project website (http://www.tundradaisy.org) and the web address will be continuously advertised to community residents during and after the study.
Fieldwork will be conducted from June 18 to July 09, 2008, in Fort McPherson, Aklavik, Inuvik, and camps where people from those communities may be both along the Peel River/western Channel and the arctic coast.