Cisco diversity in Great Slave Lake

Regions: North Slave Region

Tags: biology, fish, fisheries assessment, cisco, taxonomy

Principal Investigator: Drygeese, Jennifer (1)
Licence Number: 14617
Organization: Yellowknives Dene First Nation
Licenced Year(s): 2009
Issued: Sep 16, 2009
Project Team: Andrew Muir (Fish biologist, Golder Associates), Paul Vecsei (Fish biologist, Golder Associates), Hilary Macthans (Senior supervisor, Golder Associates), Credence Wood (Aquatic biologist, Golder Associates), Paula Smith (Aquatic biologist, Golder Associates), Gerald Fillatre (Fisheries Officer, Fisheries & Oceans Canada), Justine Crow (Aquatic biologist, Golder Associates), Jonas Baillargon (Fisheries technician, Yellowknives Dene First Nation), Jennifer Drygeese (Land & Environ. Coordinator, Yellowknives Dene First Nation), Todd Slack (Land & Environ. Coordinator, Yellowknives Dene First Nation)

Objective(s): The objectives of the research are to:
1) confirm the taxonomy of the cisco of Great Slave Lake;
2) characterize age structure and growth of individuals
3) determine prey abundance in capture locations
4) consult with, and educate local aboriginal and non-aboriginal communities by having them assist in data collection and presenting to communities the results of our research.

Project Description: The objectives of the research are to:
1) Confirm the taxonomy of the Cisco of Great Slave Lake;
2) Characterize age structure and growth of individuals;
3) Determine prey abundance in capture locations;
4) Consult with, and educate local aboriginal and non-aboriginal communities by having them assist in data collection and presenting to communities the results of research.

The benefits from this project will be threefold. First, the species composition of ciscoes in Great Slave Lake will be better understood. Second, DFO will have for the first time, some biological data and habitat information that can be used towards better management and protection of local cisco stocks. Aboriginal groups will have a better understanding and appreciation of local species diversity and, benefit by having personnel trained in fisheries work.This will be a one year project.

Approximately 300-600 ciscoes from multiple sampling sites within Yellowknife Bay will be collected during the open water season during 2009. Standardized graded mesh gillnets (3.8, 5.1, 7.6, and 10.2 centimetre square mesh) and seine nets will be used. Associated plankton, benthics, and water quality data will be collected by Kemmerer, YSI multi-probe meter, and Eckman dredge, respectively.

Local involvement will be key since we recently received SARA funding for a Traditional knowledge cisco study with a youth camp for prospective aboriginal fisheries students.

Results will be shared by public presentations and published reports.

The fieldwork for this study will be conducted from September 17, 2009 to December 31, 2009.