O-buoy measurements of ozone, carbon dioxide and bromine oxide over frozen surface of Hudson Bay and Arctic Ocean
Principal Investigator: Bottenheim, Jan W (3)
Licence Number: 14834
Organization: Environment Canada
Licenced Year(s): 2012 2011 2010
Issued: Feb 08, 2011

Objective(s): To take part in the establishment of long-term observation network to measure concentrations of two important greenhouse gases (ozone and carbon dioxide) as well as bromine oxide, a key chemical reagent determining the presence of ozone accompanied with full set of meteorological data and detailed geographic information across the Arctic Ocean and Hudson Bay.

Project Description: The goal of this project is to take part in the establishment of long-term observation network to measure concentrations of two important greenhouse gases (ozone and carbon dioxide) as well as bromine oxide, a key chemical reagent determining the presence of ozone accompanied with full set of meteorological data and detailed geographic information across the Arctic Ocean and Hudson Bay. Data acquired will provide the opportunity to improve the understanding of processes and mechanisms defining the Sub Arctic and Arctic environment. They will be used to support prediction of future earth-atmosphere behaviour in the context of global and regional air quality and climate change.

There are two main types of data collection:
1. In situ analyzer’s collect ambient air through sampling tubes and measure the concentration of ozone and carbon dioxide in real time. Instruments used are 2B Technology ozone monitor and Licor Carbon Dioxide monitor.
2. Light absorption spectrometer records sun light at different periods of time. On its way through the atmosphere to the surface of the Earth, sun light undergoes absorption by different gases present in the air. Each of the present gases leaves a fingerprint in the recorded spectra. The information on their identity and concentrations is obtained after data is transmitted on daily schedule via satellite communications with the data from the other sensors and processed in researcher headquarters.

Temperature, wind speed and direction are measured by standard meteorological sensors: thermocouple and wind propeller. The instrument package is powered by batteries or solar panels depending on available solar radiation and operates in fully automated mode. It does not require any human assistance after deployment.

The equipment is designed to monitor selected compounds over frozen surface and that limits the sampling time to periods with relatively deep (50cm) ice cover of the water basin. The equipment will be recalibrated and deployed at the same location as last year. It will conduct measurements over the winter and spring when it will be retrieved for new calibration and redeployed in the following fall. The researchers intend to repeat the deployment and measurement cycle over 4 years period.

The project will make use of facilities provided by the Polar Continental Shelf Program (PCSP). Scientific equipment will transported, stored for short time (up to 2 weeks), assembled and tested at the PCSP facilities before transporting it and deploying it in Beaufort Sea next to UNCLOS ice camp.

Data will be archived in both internal and publicly available databases (e.g. IPY data website). Research results are published in recognized scientific journals and reported to IPY. Non-technical summary will be provided and distributed to Northern communities.

The fieldwork for this study will be conducted from August 1, 2011 to December 31, 2011.