Inuit Traditional Knowledge for Adapting to the Health Effects of Climate Change (IK-ADAPT)

Regions: Inuvialuit Settlement Region

Tags: health, climate change, traditional knowledge, food security

Principal Investigator: Pearce, Tristan D (18)
Licence Number: 15402
Organization: University of Guelph, Department of Geography
Licenced Year(s): 2014 2013 2012
Issued: Jan 21, 2014
Project Team: Colleen Parker (Graduate student researcher, Department of Geography, University of Guelph), Linnaea Jasiuk (Graduate student researcher, Department of Geography, University of Guelph), Genevieve Lalonde (Undergraduate student researcher, Department of Geography, University of Guelph), Rowan Schindler (Undergraduate student researcher, Sustainability Research Centre, University of the Sunshine Coast), Ellie Stephenson (Researcher, Department of Geography, McGill University), Adam Kudlak (Community Adaptation Leader, Ulukhaktok), Interpreter (Interpretation, Ulukhaktok), Local researcher (Researcher, Ulukhaktok), Local researcher (Researcher, Ulukhaktok), Student researcher (Researcher, Ulukhaktok)

Objective(s): To examine how food security is affected by climate and socio-economic changes, and adaptation options; to examine Inuit conceptualizations on and approaches to health in the context of climate change impacts on health; and to examine perceptions of learning success among younger generation Inuit.

Project Description: In previous years, research questions were identified together with community research partners that are relevant and important to the community. This project consists of 3 complimentary research objectives. Taken together, these questions contribute to an understanding of the role Inuit traditional knowledge plays in adaptation to the health impacts of climate change.

1. Food Security, Climate Change and Health
Objective: to examine how food security is affected by climate and socio-economic changes, and adaptation options.
[Food security exists when individuals and households have reliable access to safe, nutritionally adequate, and culturally acceptable foods in a manner that maintains human dignity].

2. Inuit Traditional Knowledge and Health
Objective: to examine Inuit conceptualizations on and approaches to health in the context of climate change impacts on health.

3. Inuit traditional learning Objective: to examine perceptions of learning success among younger generation Inuit.

All research activities will be conducted together with a local research partner(s) including local researchers and translators. Respondents will be compensated for their participation in the research according to the interview protocol accepted in the community. Narrative data will be collected from community members through semi-structured interviews and short survey questions. Interviews will be conducted at the convenience of the respondent and will be conducted in Inuinnaqtun, Inuvialuktun and/or English.

This project will continue to be conducted in partnership and communication with local research partners. The project addresses key interests expressed by community members to document, conserve and promote Inuit traditional knowledge to prevent, prepare for and manage the impacts of climate change on health. During the first stage of the project, University researchers worked together with local research partners to identify the research foci and design the research. Graduate students have now been identified to work in collaboration with local researchers to pursue the respective research questions. Meaningful research relationships between community members and university researchers are essential for the success of the project and local protocols and guidelines will be followed and adhered to.

The communication of results to community members and to relevant stakeholders in the Northwest Territories will be ongoing throughout the research process. University researchers will work together with local researchers to develop locally appropriate and effective methods for communicating research results. This may include: presentations at the school, reporting results and research updates on the local radio, written plain-language reports in Inuinnaqtun and English with photos, short videos, and household visits to discuss the research and results with people.

The fieldwork for this study will be conducted from January 21, 2014 to November 30, 2014.