Climate change and structure of circumpolar boreal forests during the past century

Regions: Gwich'in Settlement Area, Dehcho Region, South Slave Region

Tags: forestry, dendrochronology, carbon, temperature, forest growth

Principal Investigator: Osawa, Akira (26)
Licence Number: 15548
Organization: Kyoto University, Graduate School of Agriculture
Licenced Year(s): 2017 2016 2015 2014 2013 2012 2011 2010 2009 2008 2007 2006 2005 2004 2003 2002 2001
Issued: Sep 25, 2014
Project Team: Xanthe Walker (stand reconstruction, Univ. Saskachewan), Yokiro Matsuura (tree ring sampling, Forestry & Forest Products Research Institute, Japan), Nahoko Osawa-Kurachi (aboveground litter analysis, Ryukoku University), Hatena Osawa (assistant, Doshisha University), Kazuaki Fujii (soil processes, Forestry & Forest Products Research Institute), Souichirou Fujii (stand reconstruction, Kyoto University), Akira Kato (remote sensing, Chiba University), Hiroyuki Obanawa (remote sensing, Chiba University), Yoshihiro Iijima (climate monitoring, Japan Agency for Marine Science and Technology), Masako Dannoura (tree physiology, Kyoto University)

Objective(s): To estimate structure and growth of forest stands in northwestern Canada by applying a stand reconstruction technique, and to examine the relationship between climate change in the Arctic region and the patterns of forest biomass growth during the past century.

Project Description: Objectives of the research are two-fold. First is to estimate structure and growth of forest stands in northwestern Canada by applying a stand reconstruction technique. Second is to examine the relationship between climate change in the Arctic region and the patterns of forest biomass growth during the past century. The research team also measure currently occurring growth and carbon dynamics of forest ecosystems in the region to clarify the quantitative relationship between climate variability and forest response.

Two basic methods will be involved in the study. First is tree measurement in selected forest study plots and collection of stem samples. The research team will collect either stem increment cores or stem disc samples. Second is analysis of tree-rings to calculate stand biomass, their annual growth, and other variables based on the recently-developed method of quantitative stand reconstruction called 'OAZ method' (Osawa et al. 2000, 2005). The research team also plan to estimate growth and carbon dynamics of current forests in selected study plots by tree measurement, aboveground litter collection, fine root dynamics studies, etc.

The research team will be able to make a presentation of this research activity in the local community particularly in Fort Smith where the team plans to stay longer.

Results of the study will eventually be published in scientific papers and/or books. They will be distributed to individuals and communities when they become available. The research team also plan to make oral presentations of the research at occasions in local communities so that people could have a chance of being informed of the activity.



The fieldwork for this study will be conducted from September 26, 2014 to December 31, 2014.