Structure, Carbon Dynamics, and Silvichronology of Boreal Forests
Principal Investigator: Osawa, Akira (26)
Licence Number: 15757
Organization: Kyoto University, Graduate School of Agriculture
Licenced Year(s): 2017 2016 2015 2014 2013 2012 2011 2010 2009 2008 2007 2006 2005 2004 2003 2002 2001
Issued: Sep 17, 2015
Project Team: Yojiro Matsuura (soil analysis, Forestry & Forest Prod. Res. Inst.), Nahoko Osawa-Kurachi (aboveground litter analysis, Hiraoka Forest Inst./Ryukoku Univ.), Akira Kato (remote sensing, Chiba University), Mouctar Kamara (tree-ring analysis, Kyoto University), Atsushi Un'no (remote sensing, Fuji Sekkey Co. Ltd.), Yushi Mochizuki (remote sensing, Fuji Sekkey Co. Ltd.), Jiyoung An (fine root/carbon dynamics, Kyoto University), Souichirou Fujii (tree-ring analysis, Kyoto University), Shota Miura (field assistant, Chiba University), Mizuki Taga (field assistant, Chiba University), Hatena Osawa (field assistant, Doshisha University)

Objective(s): To collect data in jack pine and in lesser extent black spruce forests on annual movement of organic matter and carbon; and, to continue the study of stand development and its relationship to environmental factors (a discipline called ‘silvichronology’).

Project Description: The objectives of the 2015 field work are two-fold: one is to collect data in jack pine and in lesser extent black spruce forests on annual movement of organic matter and carbon; the other is to continue the study of stand development and its relationship to environmental factors (a discipline called ‘silvichronology’). For the former objective, the research team will continue measurement of the growth of fine roots and amount of aboveground litter. For the latter, the research team plan to collect stem disk samples from about a dozen trees of various sizes at one stand of mixed jack pine and black spruce for the analysis of stand development of patterns. Additionally, changes in stand structure of some jack pine stands due to wind storm of 2013 will be assessed with the ground-based 3-dimensional laser technology by re-measuring the same stands that were examined in 2012.

Four methods will be used. 1) Soil and air temperature will be measured with sensors and data loggers. 2) Aboveground forest litter will be collected with the litter traps. 3) Annual growth of fine roots will be estimated by setting the ingrowth cores and litter bags on forest floor in the study plots. 4) The research team plan to conduct 3D laser measurement to describe stand structure of some permanent plots of jack pine that are in the Park. Trees in these plots were affected by wind storms of 2013, and substantial numbers were broken or uprooted.
a. Collected samples will be weighed, then their subsamples of aboveground litter and tree organs will be brought to the laboratories in Kyoto University, and Forestry and Forest Products Research Institute of Japan for detailed examination. Upon completion of analysis, all samples will be destroyed.
b. Samples of aboveground litter and tree organs will be sorted, air-dried, and the mass being measured where appropriate while at the base camp (in town of Fort Smith). Air-drying will keep quality of the samples until detailed examination in the laboratory.
c. Aboveground litter samples will be oven-dried at the laboratory for dry mass determination. Samples of tree organs for examination of tree-rings will be kept at air-dry condition until measurement to prevent deterioration.

A member of the research team will give a presentation of the work in the Park or in other regions in the circumpolar boreal forest (Finland, Estonia, Siberia, or Alaska) at Aurora College or at Wood Buffalo National Park Headquarters in Fort Smith.

The research team will consider giving a presentation of the research in Fort Smith. The team are also ready to be interviewed by local newspapers for an explanatory article which has been done a few times in the past.

The fieldwork for this study will be conducted from September 17, 2015 to December 31, 2015.