Indigenous Knowledge in Protected Areas Management: Adaptation, Sustainability and Opportunities in the Circumpolar North.

Regions: Inuvialuit Settlement Region, Sahtu Settlement Area

Tags: social sciences, traditional knowledge, resource management

Principal Investigator: Siivola, Delia C (1)
Licence Number: 16362
Organization: University of the Sunshine Coast
Licenced Year(s): 2018
Issued: Jul 19, 2018
Project Team: Delia Siivola (Principal Investigator, University of the Sunshine Coast), Chris Jacobson (Supervisor, University of the Sunshine Coast), Jennifer Carter (Co-Supervisor, University of the Sunshine Coast), Local translator if/as needed (Provide oral/written translation, Local community member)

Objective(s): To develop more ethical practice in cooperative management by better pointing out the role of Indigenous knowledge in arrangements today, and promote to better use of Indigenous knowledge for decision-making in the future.

Project Description: Investigating this research problem will help develop more ethical practice in cooperative management by better pointing out the role of Indigenous knowledge in arrangements today, and promote better use of Indigenous knowledge for decision-making in the future. In addition to filling identified research gaps, the research questions will draw from, and align with, the Arctic Council self-identified priorities of reporting on Indigenous knowledge and perspective of changes in biodiversity across the circumpolar North and improving the use of traditional ecological knowledge.

This proposed study will include Indigenous Peoples from three different regions of the circumpolar North: Inuit of Auyuittuq National Park, Nunavut, Canada; Inuvialuit, Sahtu Dene and Métis of Tuktut Nogait National Park, Northwest Territories, Canada; and, Altaian of Uch Enmek Nature and Culture Park, Siberia, Russia. Research would involve a combination of literature review, participant observation (e.g. the researcher participating in local events and life), and interviews. Guidance from local committees will be sought on who to interview and determining whether reasonable compensation for interviews is appropriate.

Depending on community support, 1-2 week visits to communities for interviews. Results will be shared with the communities after work is complete. Any recommendations for the research, formal committee decision or letter of support for the proposal would be gratefully appreciated.

It is intended that the results of this research is reflective of the voices of the participants. This project would like to focus on the feedback of local people, giving participants a voice within academic research to help shape the direction of Indigenous knowledge recognition into the future. If there is interest, a publication can be produced that includes local people as authors. Acknowledging Indigenous contributions by including active participants as co-authors contributes to the recognition of Indigenous knowledge by Western science as being valuable and critical to global knowledge.

These benefits are related to the potential for changes over long-term. Should the study results be applied, it would likely involve some form of institutional and/or administrative changes, and are not likely to occur very quickly. As such, application of the results are not expected to be fast, although they could be beneficial for communities and their meaningful engagement in co-management in the future.

Results will be shared with the communities after work is complete. A summary of the results (hard-copy or electronic, at their preference) will be shared directly with research participants. A summary of the results, the full thesis and any publications will be circulated through local offices for the interest of and availability to the whole community. Any local people that may participate as authors in publications will receive a full hard-copy of the publication. If the local Hunter's and Trapper's Committee or Lands Office would prefer, a results presentation can be made with the use of slides and telephone.

The fieldwork for this study will be conducted from July 19, 2018 to August 3, 2018.