Assessing the Diamond Exploration and Staking Process in Canada's North

Regions: North Slave Region

Tags: social sciences, socio-economics, diamond exploration

Principal Investigator: Hoogeveen, Dawn AB (2)
Licence Number: 14197
Organization: SFU
Licensed Year(s): 2007
Issued: Jul 13, 2007

Objective(s): This study is intended to examine Canadian mineral law in terms of diamond exploration and staking. With exploration and staking cultivating increased revenue for a variety of actors, the research objective is to investigate how economic gains of exploration activity benefit and impact residents in the NWT.

Project Description: This study is intended to examine Canadian mineral law in terms of diamond exploration and staking. With exploration and staking cultivating increased revenue for a variety of actors, the research objective is to investigate how economic gains of exploration activity benefit and impact residents in the NWT.

Archival research, including government documents and community press reports will be accessed in Yellowknife. Interviews will be done following an in-depth content analysis of documents linked to exploration, from an economic and legal standpoint. Semi-structured open-ended interviews with key informants will augment document review analysis. Key informants will include: lawyers, geologists/mineralogists, government licensing agents and community leaders who have experienced the negotiation stages involved in staking and exploration. Approximately fifteen to twenty interviews will be undertaken. Interviews will be tape-recorded when the appropriate permission is granted and transcription will be done by the research following interviews. Questions and interviews will be reviewed after a short series of pilot interviews (based on a convenience sample) and a fieldwork journal will be kept during the interview process. Interviews will be coded upon the researcher’s return to Vancouver from the Northwest Territories. During this period she will also review qualitative method techniques, in order to choose the most appropriate for the purpose of this study. Similar content analysis to the researcher’s archival document reviews will be done upon her return from the field.

The researcher will write her results up in a thesis based report. At any time she and her supervisor, Geoff Mann, may be contacted for progress reports and/or final research results. A plain language summary and/or short video will also be made available to communities in the NWT. A summary report as well as the final thesis and any publications that result from this work will be sent to the Aurora Research Institute. Social benefits may arise with a greater understanding of the connections between staking and exploration and community benefits and impacts that the researcher will explore during this initial stage of the mining process.

Fieldwork will be conducted from July 14 to December 31, 2007 in Yellowknife, NWT.