Take it from the Top Northern Perspectives on: Southern Canada, Newcomers to the North, and their land and people

Regions: Inuvialuit Settlement Region, Gwich'in Settlement Area

Tags: social sciences, education, northern perspective

Principal Investigator: Robinson, Suzanne M (7)
Licence Number: 14465
Organization: NWT Literacy Council/ Inuvik Literacy Circle/ Aurora College
Licensed Year(s): 2010 2009 2008
Issued: Feb 10, 2009
Project Team: Mandie Abrams (Funding Administration, NWT Literacy Council), Lorna Keating (Instructor Supervisor and Advisor, Aurora College), Linda Flynn (Advisory Commitee, Aurora College), David King (Technical Advisor, Aurora College), Bev Garven (Advisory Committee, Inuvik Literacy Circle and Inuvik Library), Inuvik Learning Centre Students (Reserach Team, Aurora College), Dennis Allen (Film Consultant, MackenzieDelta Films)

Objective(s): The objectives of this research are: 1) to train students to conduct primary research using interviewing, video and reflective assignments to support learning and foster increased research in the North by Northerners; 2) To create a high quality product that can be used as a learning tool for Northern and Southern Students.

Project Description: This licence is being issued for the scientific research application no. 976.

The objectives of this research are: 1) to train students to conduct primary research using interviewing, video and reflective assignments to support learning and foster increased research in the North by Northerners; 2) To create a high quality product that can be used as a learning tool for Northern and Southern Students.

This video project will be a participatory research project. Student collection methods will be personal reflective journaling, questionnaires, focus groups, and interviews. The initial research will include approximately 30 students who will discuss their thoughts, experiences, and beliefs on southern and Northern Studies. They will then construct interview questions, select interview participants, arrange interviews, conduct interviews, and review and edit footage. The main research data collection will be open-ended questions, videotaped interviews and workshops.

The six video segments will then be shown at various community events and focus groups. There will also be a segment created about the entire student research project. Ultimately, the video series will be shared with schools and Learning Centres throughout the Territories. If funding permits, they will also be shared with Southern educational institutions. Educational materials will also be developed and included with the segments on DVD so that the videos can be more readily used in the classroom. This project is not only an excellent learning opportunity for Northern students but it will create an important educational tool for both Northern and Southern classrooms.

This video project is a participatory research project. Community involvement is possible in three main ways: as a student researcher, as a community interview research participant and as a workshop participant to provide feedback on the video series. The project is designed to maximize community involvement and input. The plan is to facilitate and provide a venue for local people to speak to their perceptions, their community and say what they want to say.

The fieldwork for this study will be conducted in Aklavik, Inuvik, Fort McPherson, Tsiigehtchic, Ulukhaktok and Tuktoyaktuk from February 10 to December 31, 2009.