Modelling Temperature and Heat Fluxes of Great Bear Lake
Principal Investigator: Schertzer, William M. (2)
Licence Number: 14529
Organization: Environment Canada
Licensed Year(s): 2009 2008
Issued: Jun 05, 2009
Project Team: William M. Schertzer (Physical Limnology, Environment Canada), David C.L. Lam (Integrated Modelling, Environment Canada), Ram Yerubandi (Hydrodynamics, Environment Canada), Wayne R. Rouse (Physical Climatology, McMaster University), Peter D. Blanken (Climatology (evaporation), University of Colorado), John Gyakum (Synoptic/Dynamic Meteorology, McGill University), Eddy Carmack (Physical Oceanography, Institute of Ocean Sciences), David A. Swayne (Computer Science, University of Guelph), Luis Leon (Modelling, Environment Canada), Eyad Atallah (Dynamic Meteorology, McGill University), Craig McCrimmon (Physical Science, Environment Canada), Normand Bussieres (Remote Sensing (Temperature), Meteorological Service Canada), Anne E. Walker (Remote Sensing (ice/snow), Meteorological Service Canada), Bob Rowsell (Physical Science/Engineering, Environment Canada), Edward Reeves (Deline/Great Bear L. (contact), Deline (DRRC))

Objective(s): The four main objectives of this research are: 1) to conduct observations on Great Bear Lake to measure meteorology, heat fluxes, and physical limnological components; 2) to model the thermal structure of Great Bear Lake under current climate and climate changed conditions; 3) to quantify the variability in the meteorological, heat flux and limnological characteristics of Great Bear Lake based on 2004-2009 observations; 4) to assess the effect of climate on the temperature structure and heat fluxes of Great Bear Lake.

Project Description: This licence is being issued for the scientific research application No.1100.

The four main objectives of this research are: 1) to conduct observations on Great Bear Lake to measure meteorology, heat fluxes, and physical limnological components; 2) to model the thermal structure of Great Bear Lake under current climate and climate changed conditions; 3) to quantify the variability in the meteorological, heat flux and limnological characteristics of Great Bear Lake based on 2004-2009 observations; 4) to assess the effect of climate on the temperature structure and heat fluxes of Great Bear Lake.

This research study is part of the IPY-BIONET Study. Year-round, 10-minute meteorological and radiation flux observations will continue to be located at the existing NWRI climate station at Deline (old airport runway) and at Lionel Island. The measurement will include air temperature, relative humidity, wind speed and direction, atmospheric pressure and precipitation and solar and longwave radiation fluxes.

Fixed Temperature “Year-round” Moorings (Deep Lake) will be deployed as water temperature moorings profiles in the deep lake at the mouth of the Keith Arm, at the mouth of the Smith-Dease Arm and in the McTavish Arm with the vessel the Debra-Lynn. Instrumentations consist of Branker temperature loggers at specific depths in the water. These temperature moorings were configured to remain operational as “year-round” moorings and will remain operational to the fall of 2009 when they will require retrieval using the Debra-Lynn.

In 2008-09, three APEX Temperature Profilers were installed using the Debra-Lynn. The APEX profilers report temperature observations via ARGOS satellite every three days. Transmission stops when the instruments do not come to the surface indicating the date of ice formation and ice open conditions at their coordinates. The APEX profilers are not fixed temperature moorings and can move with the water currents, thus providing qualitative information on the water movement at these parts of the lake. Retrieval of the APEX Temperature Profilers will be attempted in the fall of 2009 using the Debra Lynn based on GPS coordinates received by ARGOS satellite transmission.

The fieldwork for this study will be conducted Great Bear Lake from June 4 to December 31, 2009.